Woman Wednesday: Lorie

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Lorie, Cincinnati, Ohio

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 Q: What are you passionate about?

A: I think of myself as a cheerleader with the core message that life is difficult but doable. I am passionate about sharing this message with my various audiences. I have worked as a motivational speaker, as a syndicated columnist, as a published author, and now as a blogger. In all cases, my method of operation has been to tell the stories of my life hoping other people will glean life lessons from them. By the way, I am also a professional quilter and even the quilts I make have words and symbols pieced into the design as they, too, tell stories with life lessons. Here are two examples:

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This quilt addresses my professional life where there is a mountain after mountain to climb in order to find BIG success. Sometimes, it seems like the sky is falling, as the sky-blue background fabric does on the bottom of the quilt. But instead of quitting, I persistently climb one mountain after another, planning someday to be an “overnight success,” though it may take 20 years to get there.

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On this quilt, I address the issue that I have always felt odd in life. When my girlfriends giggled over boys in high school, I made appointments with my rabbi to discuss existentialism. When my friends were celebrating a decade or two of marriage, I was getting divorced. Thus, on this quilt, I am the green bird when everyone else is red. And I’m headed west as opposed to the eastward heading flock. But guess what? I am perfect just the way I am, and I am proud to be a strange bird!

NOTE: My quilt designs–printed out on quality giftware–are available on Etsy.

 

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Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I grew up in a tight-knit family where love abounded. I was always neat, sweet, and in my seat, because there were so many loved ones who cared. I couldn’t step off the straight and narrow because I would have disappointed them all.

Throughout my life, people have always come to me with their problems, needing me to cheer them on. As a teenager, I often got off the phone in tears after talking to friends who needed help. My dad told me that if I couldn’t talk on the phone without getting so upset, then I couldn’t talk on the phone! I think his words sent me in the direction of my motivational speaking, my writing, and my quilt art. All of these allow me to reach a lot of people without getting personally involved with each one. 

I don’t mean to sound like a woman who thinks she has all the answers. Instead, this is a quote that defines me and my work: We tend to teach best that which we most need to learn. So, the things I talk about in my creative work are things I need to learn myself. This recent blog will attest to that. Try as I might, I just can’t learn that good enough is good enough! Hopefully, my readers will catch on even if I never do!

By the way, I graduated magna cum laude from the University of Missouri with a degree in Elementary Education, but I have never had a classroom. Instead, I have had lecture audiences and book/blog/column readers.

 

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Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: As I said earlier, I think life is difficult but doable. I even have a very simple recipe for personal and professional success: You need to take one step a day–even if it is a teeny tiny one–in the direction of your goal. You have to do this day after day after day. 

For the last two years, I have been spreading this message via social media posts. Below you will find some examples of my “keep on keeping on” philosophy. There are 800 posts like these on my social media accounts: on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Please note that it is easiest to see them all in a row on the Instagram account.

 

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Q: What does feminism mean to you?

A: Women are every bit as capable as men; therefore, women should get equal pay, equal respect, etc. Also, for every glass ceiling women shatter, the world will be a better place.

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Q: What are you currently working on? 

A: At the moment, I am focusing on my writing and on promoting it. To further this goal, I ask your help in two ways:

  • Please consider reading my newest book, Love, Loss, and Moving On. If you’ve ever reinvented yourself after the loss of a loved one, this book’s for you. Did you go a bit crazy in the process? Yep! Me too. The book is available on Amazon in paperback and eBook formats.
  • I hope you will also subscribe to my blog/newsletter. When you do, you will receive a FREE downloadable booklet with a dozen motivational images/messages entitled, “Some Do’s and Don’ts in Life.”

 

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And don’t forget to visit my website: https://www.loriekleinereckert.com!

I’d love to connect with you!

Facebook

LinkedIn

Twitter

Instagram

Pinterest

 

Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Ruby B. Johnson

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Ruby B. Johnson, Sierra Leone, West Africa

“Three things: take care of your mental health, control your narrative, and work smart and do your research.” 

 

Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I am a mining engineer and currently work at a gold mining operation. I am also the founder and editorial director of STEMher by Ruby B. Johnson Magazine. Premiered in September 2018 with its autumn issue, STEMher Magazine is a print magazine showcasing the education and experiences of girls and women in science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM) academia, careers, and programs. STEMher celebrates women thriving in their careers and inspires others to fuel their curiosity and interests in STEM; the status of individuals featured range from middle school through retirement. In one year, STEMher has featured more than 50 STEM girls and women worldwide from countries like the United States of America, Australia, Ghana, Canada, South Africa, India, France, Nigeria, Channel Islands, The Bahamas, Sierra Leone, and England. All magazine issues are available for purchase on stemher.com and Amazon Marketplace.

 

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Summer 2019 Cover

 

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I was born in Freetown, Sierra Leone [in West Africa]. I moved to the United States when I was 12 years old, which meant growing up and completing my middle school and high school education in Maryland. I graduated from Virginia Tech with a BSc in mining engineering and a minor in women’s studies leadership. While in college, I founded When You Believe Foundation, a program that empowers women and girls through social media engagement, workshops, and donations. In 2012, I competed in my first pageant, Miss Sierra Leone USA, with the platform of advocating for the recruitment and retention of girls and women in STEM fields, since I was a STEM college student at the time and women’s empowerment was something I was passionate about. I won the pageant and with that title, I was able to travel across the country as well as in Sierra Leone, encouraging girls and young women to pursue STEM. After the crowns and titles, STEM advocacy and women’s empowerment continues to be my lifelong platform. I wanted to take this platform to another level to be able to reach women and girls I may never cross paths with, so I created STEMher by Ruby B. Johnson Magazine last year. 

 

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Q: What is something valuable you’ve learned that you’d like others to know? 

A: Three things: take care of your mental health, control your narrative, and work smart and do your research. (1) From Monday through Thursdays, I work ten-hour days and a two-hour commute to and from work. Additionally, I am an entrepreneur who runs her own business creating content and putting together each issue for STEMher by Ruby B. Johnson Magazine. I also serve in a couple of ministries at my church. Life gets busy. In the last year, I’m being intentional to prioritize my mental health. Making time to rest and slow down when necessary. In order to be productive with work, I have to take care of myself by sleeping, eating healthy, exercising, spending time with God through prayer, and meditation as well as reading my Bible. I have to be intentional about making time for myself, family and friends, as well as work. It’s okay to say “no” or “not yet” sometimes. I cannot fill the cups of others when my cup is empty. It’s also okay to ask for help—whether it’s in prayer, family and friends, community, or therapy.

 

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(2) As I navigate through the professional world and life in general, I’m realizing how important it is for one to control their narrative. Of course we cannot fully control what people say about us or how they feel about us; however, I believe we can play a role in those things. The way we carry ourselves is very important. We have to learn wisdom on when to speak up or be silent. We must be our biggest defenders and tell people how we want them to treat or address us. (3) Running a business is no easy feat and it’s time-consuming. In college, I learned to not study hard but study smart. I believe that’s important to do when you are a business owner. Being that I don’t have a business or journalism background, I spend a lot of time learning—asking questions, reading articles, listening to podcasts, and everything else in between. I want this magazine to go beyond, so that means I have to put in the work. I may not see harvest immediately, but sowing seeds each day counts. All in all, I believe it’s important to know who you are, stand firm on your values, always remember your why, and never lose your humanity no matter what environment you are in. 

 

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Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: To me, feminism means being my authentic self, living out my God-given purpose, and being intentional about making a difference in the community. While working on my women’s studies leadership minor in college, I learned about intersectionality. I am a Christian woman, born and raised in Sierra Leone, a naturalized American citizen, a woman in STEM, usually one of few or only black people in some professional settings, and a family-oriented individual. I thrive because of these lived experiences but also have a heart and a curious mind to learn about those who are different from me. Feminism to me is never compromising my faith and also being compassionate to others. To me, feminism means to reach for excellence and nothing less.

 

I’d love to connect with you!

Important Links

 

 

Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Sophie

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Sophie, Lichfield, England

“Most successful people have been through a struggle at some point, and I believe it is these hard times that create the grit necessary for entrepreneurship.” 

 

 

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I believe that through struggle, comes light.

My younger years weren’t filled with rainbows and unicorns. My amazing mom suffers from bipolar disorder and 20 years ago, when I was growing up, there was not as much support or understanding around the topic. This meant that I was more the parent in our relationship. I believe this experience is the catalyst to why I carry so much compassion towards women and the reason behind my passion as a coach.

 

 

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Q: What are you passionate about?

A: I’m Sophie Starkey, a women’s sales strategist and founder of The Authentic Selling System. I am on a mission to change the way that women feel about selling.

I know far too many women who have amazing talents and gifts to share with the world who deserve crazy success and they never get there because they aren’t comfortable with selling.

Having spent most of my career coaching women, I noticed a trend that crops up over and over again. You see, we are such heart-driven beings that selling makes us feel uncomfortable, to say the least!

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Q: What is something valuable you’ve learned that you’d like others to know? 

A: Going through struggles can often reveal the core of who we are. One thing I have learned from my own background and others like it is that most successful people have been through a struggle at some point, and I believe it is these hard times that create the grit necessary for entrepreneurship. 

 

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Q: What does feminism mean to you?

A: If I was to be honest with you, “feminist” isn’t a word that I would associate with, but at the same time, I suppose “feminist” is a perfect word to describe my values!

I often get inquiries from men who want to work with me, I will work with men if we are the right fit for one another, but my passion lies with coaching women. I once had a guy that said he was offended that my marketing is aimed at women. I told him that I am not anti-man; I am just pro-woman!

 

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Connect with me! Here: 
Website

Facebook

Insta

 

 

Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Keisha

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Keisha, Antigo, Wisconsin 

“Life is not defined by circumstance but instead comes from an understanding of yourself and your true power.” 

 

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Q: What are you passionate about?

A: Nothing excites me more than to see a woman step into her true power, her purpose. I am passionate about helping women realize what’s possible for them. I love providing the tools and guidance to shift their mindsets, manifest their dreams, and shift their whole life experience. Check out the Abundant Mother Hustler email list and more here.

 

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Q: What were your younger years like?

A: My childhood and young adolescence molded me to be and live in survival-mode most of my life. I grew up in multiple homes between my grandparents, father, and mother, but around age 14, I permanently moved out and bounced around from friends’ homes throughout high school.

 

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I believe my struggles, my life stories, and living with constant uncertainty developed this passion inside me to overcome, to learn, and to discover that life is not defined by circumstance but instead comes from an understanding of yourself and your true power. I am living proof you can transform your outside world and life from within your mind.

 

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Q: What is something valuable you’ve learned that you’d like others to know? 

A: Every single person has a gift, talent, and ability. Every single person has the power to transform their lives if they shift to a higher level of thinking. 95% of what we do is controlled by our subconscious minds, 5% is influenced by our everyday level of thinking, known as our thoughts. When a person discovers and learns how to master their thoughts, they can transform their subconscious and accomplish/attract their desires, unearth their talents, gifts, and abilities, which allows them to live a much higher quality of life. That’s where my passion to teach comes in and why I do what I do.

Read about the unconscious mind here. 

 

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Q: What does feminism mean to you?

A: Feminism means to me that every woman has a birthright to live her best life.

 

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Thank you for reading! 

 

 

Connect with me! I’d love to chat with you! 

Click here to connect with Keisha!

 

 

Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Jamie

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.       


 

Q and A with Jamie, Vancouver, Washington

 

“Limits are a mindset, not a reality.  Allow yourself to try things and treat life like a game.”

 

Q: What are you passionate about?

A: I am incredibly passionate about being the architect of my life. I am consumed and wildly in love with this idea that as I build a business, I’m creating something in our world that was never there before and can help people along the way.

 

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I run a digital agency called Trend Rocket Digital, and I’m a business coach focused on female empowerment. I believe it’s my duty to show women that you CAN have it all and that happiness gets to look like whatever you believe it to be.

I found this passion when I was 18, and truthfully, it came to me suddenly. I was sitting on the floor of my 650-square-foot apartment, 6 hours away from home, after being let go from a nursing job due to my brain condition and I had no clue how I was going to move forward. I knew that I couldn’t live a normal life if my health continued to get in the way and then I realized, I was going to have to build my life. So, I dropped out of college that day and pursued entrepreneurship.

 

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: My younger years really made me who I am. I have an incredible family. I was raised out in the country with my mom who was my best friend, and my step-dad who was in my eyes, my dad. He was an entrepreneur himself, but also incredibly down to earth. I had 3 brothers and a sister, too. But, my childhood was also incredibly full of struggle. At 14, I began having health issues where I’d lose my vision and get incredibly dizzy. For a couple of years, it was pushed off by doctors as puberty and hormone imbalance.

 

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However, by my senior year, I was now in a wheelchair with an undiagnosed condition that was getting progressively worse. I was passing out up to 50 times a day. I’d broken ribs, sprained everything imaginable, and yet, every test came back normal. I had grown masses on my spine that were affecting my nerves and every day was potentially my last. Not only did doctors not know what was wrong, but they also couldn’t tell me that one more concussion wasn’t going to kill me.

It took us 5 years to finally find out I had a rare brain disorder called Dysautonomia.

 

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My childhood and high school years were obviously life-changing, but I believe that this was a massive piece of who I am now. Without this illness, I wouldn’t have learned to be independent, strong, and a problem solver. I wouldn’t have had the interest in self-love, and development. I would never have imagined that I should run a company on my computer. But all of this came because this rare disorder shaped me into a capable woman.

By the time I was 20, I had also unfortunately lost my step-dad to a battle with stage 4 cancer, and my brother to another illness. My family has been through so much, but because of it, I’d say we value our lives, health, and time more than anyone else I know.

 

Q: What is something valuable you’ve learned that you’d like others to know? 

A. I think if my story can teach anything, it’s that if I can find joy and happiness in life after dealing with all that I’ve dealt with, and still build a business—you can truly do whatever you desire.

Limits are a mindset, not a reality.  Allow yourself to try things and treat life like a game. No one gets out alive anyway, and the worst that will happen is that you’ll end up in the same spot you’re in now.

 

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Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: I think, for the most part, feminism is a great concept. However, I think that at the core, many women also seem to lean into their own excuses and place sexism as the reason they’re not where they desire to be.

 

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There’s an episode of The Profit where a woman who runs a successful online flower shop continually brought up sexism as the reason she wasn’t getting investors, when truthfully, it was because she was incredibly hard to deal with as a person and basically cried “sexist” to anyone who told her that something was wrong in her business.

You don’t get to be the empowered woman you are capable of being and play victim at the same time. Believe it or not, the market will buy a great product–regardless of who’s selling it–man or woman. The market isn’t sexist, and you can’t allow feminism to be the reason you’re losing.

Go grab what’s yours, empower yourself, empower your fellow sisters in business (or just other women period), and earn the life you desire!

 

On the images I’ve attached:

One was on Christmas day with my dad who was battling stage 4 cancer, and me in my wheelchair. We were still having so much fun that day and making the most of it.

There’s also an image of my man and me. He’s been there through so much and has been the greatest support system in my life and business.

There’s an image of myself and a large group of friends. That was at my company launch party!

There’s an image of my mom, my sister, and I.

And then, just one of me! The reason I chose that one of me is because I’m sitting on my desk by my computer, and it represents so much to me. I built my desk by hand. I used all the tools, sanded it, painted it, and then it became the space where I built my business. So much of me has gone into this desk, and this computer–so, I think it’s a perfect image for this!

Connect with me! I’d love to chat with you! 

Comment below!