Woman Wednesday: 25 Christmas Gifts That Don’t Cost a Thing

Merry Christmas to all of our readers who celebrate the wonderful holiday of Christmas! And warm wishes and Happy Holidays to our readers around the world who may or may not celebrate other holidays. In the spirit of today, December 25, Christmas, we’ve collected 25 “gifts” for you. These “gifts” are 25 life “gifts” that cannot be bought with money, and they are “gifts” mentioned by our featured women on The Woman Wednesday Blog. Enjoy! 

 

  1. Family. They might not always be there, so appreciate the time you have with them. Three years ago, I lost my Dad to cancer and that has been one of the most difficult things I’ve ever been through. He was gone 3 months after his diagnosis. My family and I barely had time to process one piece of information before being hit with something new. It rocked my world losing someone so close to me.” ~Jessica M., Maryland

  2. Friends. True friends are there for your ups and downs, successes and failures. They like you for the person you are, and they cannot be bought.

  3. Love. True love is one of the most beautiful and magical aspects of life. Of course, it cannot be bought!

  4. Positive mindset. You can make today a good day or a bad day. It’s all about your mindset. “I learned very early on that I could either be a victim of circumstance or I could take those challenges and grow from them. I try really hard to be a force of positivity and a problem solver.” ~Melissa, Utah 

    “If you don’t believe in yourself first, you will fail every time. So for me, first and foremost is get your mindset right in the beginning, and set the foundations to build an amazing life for yourself and stick at it! The only way you will stick at anything is self-reliance, discipline, and self-belief.”   ~Carly, Melbourne, Australia


  5. Moral support. Whether giving moral support or receiving it, being there for someone does not cost a thing.“He was so understanding of my situation and was like the perfect puzzle piece to the kids and I.” ~Lisa, Canada 

  6. Giving back. Giving our time to others is one of the greatest gifts we have to give, whether we are making dinner with our family, visiting a grandparent or old friend, or volunteering for a good cause. 

  7. Hard work. It feels good to know hard work.“I have learned that nothing comes easy that is worthwhile, and this is where hard work and grit comes in.” ~Sarah, Washington

  8. Success. When you finally achieve what you set out to achieve, there is no other feeling like it! 

  9. Independence. “Be you, stay you, do you. There is no one like you and the moment you appreciate that about you, the rest of the world will!” ~Maria Tan, Philippines 

  10. Passion. “Passion is what makes you persevere through setbacks, unhappiness, and fear of failure to achieve your dreams. It is the core drive of your motivation.” ~Ashlee, Florida

  11. Proving haters wrong. “People will judge you, try to change you, try to break you, and even try to stop you. But that is all in the process of getting to the top!” ~Felissa, Georgia

  12. Health. We don’t have full control over our health, but what we do each day matters. If you are able to get out of bed right now, that is a gift. The doctors told me I might never walk again. When you’re faced with that kind of news, you have a choice—accept what you’re being told or try and do something about it.”  ~Kezia, England

  13. Exercise. People would pay big money to live longer. Here is one FREE way to live longer: exercise! Though it may be difficult to get started, exercise has amazing benefits! The studies don’t lie; exercise can make you live longer! So, if you are able, find something you like that gets your body moving! If you have the ability to move your body, that is a gift. 

  14. Creating. Creating something with your own hands feels amazing. Create a story, a poem, a drawing, build something. “Don’t be afraid to put your work out there. It’s very daunting at first, but it’s so rewarding when people read your book and tell you how much they love it.” ~Dee J. Stone, Surname authors in USA

    “Whenever you feel completely disappointed, desperate, and that life is completely pointless, turn to that color or canvas, pot or music, or whatever makes you feel joy.” ~Ioana, Romania


  15. Patience. If it does not come easily to you, it can be learned.

  16. Mindfulness. “I have to take care of myself by sleeping, eating healthy, exercising, spending time with God through prayer, and meditation as well as reading my Bible. I have to be intentional about making time for myself, family and friends, as well as work.” ~Ruby B. Johnson, West Africa

  17. Curiosity. We can be curious and try new things and explore this beautiful planet.Something I’d like others to know is that whatever you want to do is possible if you really want to make it happen. I make traveling and seeing the world a priority. This isn’t to say that I spend an extreme amount of money on it either. I budget it into my expenses just like groceries. I need to see the world. And while I love my job, I always feel a constant urge to know that the world and my life is bigger than sitting at a desk or on a train. It’s always worth it, and it is totally possible!” ~Justine S., New Jersey  

  18. Knowledge. You never know what you might learn next and how it may impact the rest of your life. “I signed up for one design class and absolutely loved it! I found that I not only had a passion for interior design, but I had a God-given gift to envision a space based off my clients’ wants and needs.” ~Ariel, Texas

  19. Choice. Knowing you have choice to eat that sandwich, see that friend, to remove someone negative from your life. It’s your choice.You are amazing! Take care and love yourself. You are worth loving! You have everything you need inside of yourself. You have the cognitive power to improve your life through your thoughts and emotions. If you’re stuck in a bad relationship or situation, know you have the power to change that.” ~Lisa, Canada

    “In my point of view, during our lives, we have the chance to make positive impacts in our environment by understanding that life is full of good intent. I am passionate about people. Each of us has a story—something to tell the world. As human beings, we all deserve to be unique and to make mistakes in order to learn.” ~Idoia, Spain


  20. Forgiveness. Forgiving someone doesn’t necessarily mean letting someone who is negative back in your life. You can forgive without compromising your happiness. Forgiving someone will most likely make you happier; you can forgive this person to their face or just in your heart. 

  21. Appreciation for the good and bad. Being able to appreciate not only the good but the bad. See the bad as opportunities to make you a better person, to learn, to experience the world fully. It is all a part of the ride. “What I’ve learned in my journey is that life is a journey full of hills and valleys. I used to believe that I was a victim to life’s circumstances, but what I had to be awakened to is that I also had choices in the decisions I was making in my life.” ~Amiee, Indiana

    “I have learned to enjoy every moment. I wish I could go back to my 16-year-old self and tell her that nothing in life is as important as you think it is when you think about it. Everything in life moves on and changes, and everything is about different stages.” ~Leire, Spain


  22. Nature. “My favorite quote is ‘There’s a sunrise and sunset in every single day, and they’re absolutely free. Don’t miss any of them.'” ~Stacy, Florida

  23. Senses. The smell of roses. The feel of cotton. The sight of flowers or clouds in the sky. The touch of a hug from a loved one. The taste of pizza. We derive a lot of happiness from our senses. They compromise the human experience! Having a bad day? Go pick yourself some flowers, eat your favorite food, take a warm shower, watch the sunset, or give someone a hug! 

  24. Ability to read. When you can read, the world is at your fingertips. You can learn anything, do anything. Anything is possible. “I learn from these stories and it’s important to me. They color the dreams of my reality and future and help me find the adventure in my life. Find your life’s adventures.” ~Lachelle, California

  25. Being alive today. 

You are alive today. While you have probably heard the saying, “Life is a precious gift,” a question you must ask yourself is…

Do you live each day as if it were a gift?

It is easy to get caught up in the day-to-day stresses and activities and requirements we face each day. Requirements to go to work, to feed our family, to clean our apartment or house, to pick up this, do that, cancel this, and so on. Maybe someone cut you off on the road, you got in a fight with your mother, or you got stuck in traffic for two hours. Or worse, you are drowning in debt, you lost someone near and dear to you, or you are suffering from a health condition (physical, mental, you name it). The fact is you are alive now. You may not be tomorrow. It’s simply the truth that you just don’t know what tomorrow could bring. We need to try our best to enjoy every single day that we are alive. And that may be hard sometimes, especially if you are suffering from a terminal disease in a hospital bed, or you lost someone who means the world to you, or you suffer from depression and you constantly feel it. No one lives this life without suffering, and no one makes it out alive. While we could be sad and harp on death, choose to harp on life. Because you are here now. Make choices to live your life the best way you can. Choose to see the good. Choose to see life. Choose to live it the way you want. 

At the end of the day, there is nothing greater than the gift of life. You are alive. So, what do you want to do today with your precious gift of today? Do you want to say hello to a stranger and make their day? Do you want to go for a walk outside? Do you want to bake cookies with your mom or go to lunch with dad? Do you want to catch up with a sibling or an old friend? Do you want to snuggle with your cat? Do you want to finally take the first step toward following your dreams? Do you want to tell your family how much you love them? Do you want to watch the sunset? Do you want to go try the tacos at that new Mexican restaurant that just opened? Do you want to drive or fly to a place you have never been to before? Do you want to profess your love to someone you can’t get out of your mind? Whatever it is you have always wanted to do, ask yourself, “Why not do it today?” Because today is a gift. Use it however you choose. 

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays! 

Wishing you health, happiness, and the power for you to create your day as you wish.

 

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Photo by Public Domain Pictures on Pexels.com

 

For more inspirational content and stories of women from across the world, visit The Woman Wednesday Blog.

Woman Wednesday: Alison

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Alison W., Virginia Beach, Virginia

“Comparison is the thief of joy.” 

 

 Q: What are you passionate about?

A: I am passionate about helping women feel beautiful in their own skin. I am the owner of Wanderlust Dream Hair, and I sell hair toppers for women with thinning hair, women with hair loss due to medical conditions, and women who just want that extra volume! I have always had fine, thin hair and tried everything to make it appear thicker: hair extensions, volumizing spray, et cetera, but nothing really worked for me because traditional hair extensions do not address thinning on the top of your head. I also started medical treatment for chronic migraines that created even more hair loss, so I was motivated to find a solution. Then I discovered toppers! Toppers clip to the top of your existing hair and create the appearance of thicker, fuller hair.

 

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Body image is such a big issue for a lot of women. Most of us don’t realize that those celebrity hairstyles we covet are just wigs, toppers, or extensions. Hollywood paints a false picture of what a naturally beautiful woman looks like.

 

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Q: What were your younger years like?

A: My younger years were volatile. I was born with a limb difference (Poland syndrome), which means I only have two fingers on my right hand. So, confidence was a big issue for me growing up. Add thin hair to that, and you have a recipe for a wallflower. My mom was diagnosed with brain cancer and passed away when I was 13. I remember when she brought home her first wig from the wig bank. She hated it. It was hot and because it was made for someone else, it never fit her comfortably. She was embarrassed to leave the house somedays because of how she looked. I really wish that we had known about toppers back then. I think she would have loved them. My mom is a big part of my “why” when it comes to my business.

 

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Pictured: One of Alison’s clients using her Wanderlust Dream Hair topper

 

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: Something valuable I learned from a young age, due to my limb difference, is that sometimes you have to find your own way. You have to figure out how to do things yourself and not try to imitate someone else’s process because it might not work for you. I think this idea is helpful in life and in business. Comparison is the thief of joy. We are resilient, and it is amazing what we can do when we let go of traditional mindsets about how to do things and figure out what works for us. I’ve also learned to laugh at myself more. I started taking improv/comedy classes a couple of years ago. Being on stage is one of the most exhilarating things I have ever done. It has also boosted my confidence in general. The first rule of improv is to make your partner look good, which means saying yes to whatever they say. So, if they tell you that you are an alien, you are an alien. I’ve learned a lot about teamwork and confidence doing improv. I highly recommend improv; it is so good for the soul.

 

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Pictured: Before and after of one of Alison’s clients using her Wanderlust Dream Hair topper. Hair topper is shown on the right. 

 

Q: What does feminism mean to you?

A: Feminism is a word that has always had a bit of a negative connotation to me. I am more of an egalitarian; meaning in my marriage, we share all of the responsibilities. There is no such thing as woman’s work or man’s work. My husband is the better cook anyway! And I can lay a tile floor. I love busting through those gender expectations. I am definitely not anti-man, but I am definitely pro-woman! I think it is important for women to support other women. Yes, we have disadvantages in the workplace. Yes, we are not always treated equally. So, I think it is important to support and encourage each other as women instead of tearing each other down. We women can be super competitive, but I want to cheer on my competition. I want us all to win.

 

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I’d love to connect with you! 

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wanderlustdreamhair/

Website: https://www.wanderlustdreamhair.com/shop

 

 

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Woman Wednesday: Jessica M.

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Jessica M., Baltimore, Maryland

“There will be messy days, 2-steps-backward days, and you’re-rocking-it days, but as long as you keep showing up to your life, it’s progress.”

 

 Q: Tell us about you! 

A: I’m a full-time working mom of an active, fun-loving 7-year-old, and I’m still trying to figure out how to balance all the moving parts. I work as an administrator for Atwater’s in Baltimore. I never expected to find myself in a field of finance because my brain runs toward creativity, but Atwater’s is an amazing company! The effort is worth it because I fully support their brand and values of bringing wholesome food to your table. Check them out, seriously!

 

Q: What are you passionate about?

A: I’m still in a place of discovering my passions and what lights my fire. I’ve always struggled with figuring out who I want to be, but most recently, my creative spark has gravitated toward disrupting photography. It’s become a tool on my journey through healing. Mostly what I create, from poetry to photography, has been for me and a select few, but I hope to one day take it a step further and share my truth to the world through an art series.

 

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Q: What were your younger years like?

A: My younger years were a little bit challenging but happy because I was surrounded by a loving family. When I was two, my parents discovered that I have severe bilateral hearing loss. I was immediately fitted with hearing aids and started speech therapy. One thing that many people don’t realize is that I don’t know sign language. Many people assume that I should know it. A lot of my understanding of speech comes from lip reading. Reading lips helps fill in the gaps of what I hear, distinguishing specific letters and sounds.

 

 

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Those working with me (as a very young child) thought I belonged in a school for the deaf like anyone else with a hearing loss, but my parents felt I shouldn’t be limited by my disability, so in 2nd grade, they started me in a mainstream private elementary school. Most teachers were extremely supportive throughout my school years, from taking the time to make sure I was following along okay in class to ensuring I had the best seat to see them. I almost hit a roadblock when I was accepted into a private high school because once they knew I was hearing impaired, they didn’t think I would be a good fit due to a bad experience with a previous hearing-impaired student. My parents, tutor, and I went to the school and fought for my right to be there because I shouldn’t be judged based on the actions of another.

 

I admit that I spent a lot of years embarrassed by my disability and have actively tried to hide it, feeling like I didn’t fit in. But as I get older, I’m learning it’s not a weakness. My mother always reminds me of the strength I’ve had in overcoming it by mainstreaming into an educational world that did not cater to my disability. When my parents started this path with me, there wasn’t a lot of education and understanding out there for hearing loss. My parents have always been my biggest supporters and advocates, and I am truly grateful that they believed in me.

 

Q: What is something valuable you’ve learned that you’d like others to know? 

A: Three years ago, I lost my Dad to cancer and that has been one of the most difficult things I’ve ever been through. He was gone 3 months after his diagnosis. My family and I barely had time to process one piece of information before being hit with something new. It rocked my world losing someone so close to me. It shaped the way I experience health anxiety and dropped me into depression. Each experience that struck after the loss of my Dad eventually set me on the path of taking care of my mental health. That has been my biggest goal this year by starting counseling and learning the tools to cope with my anxiety and depression.

 

 

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Some of the most valuable things I have learned are that talking about your pain instead of bottling it up truly helps, and healing is not a straight, upward line. There will be messy days, 2-steps-backward days, and you’re-rocking-it days, but as long as you keep showing up to your life, it’s progress. And I don’t just mean getting out there when you feel crappy and getting it done anyway. If I feel down and need to lay in bed for a while instead, that’s progress too, because I’m allowed to put down the “happy mask” and say, “I’m not okay,” and care for my mental health first.

 

Q: What does feminism mean to you?

A: In the past, I never really defined myself as a feminist, and I have thought, at times, all I was good enough for was caring for my home and family. The 1950s housewife seemed a normal thing. I personally think that if that’s what you want, then it’s okay. I wish I had the opportunity to be a stay-at-home mom. But when it becomes a situation where you’re treated like that’s your only place and you’re not equal or you’re “less than” others, then it starts to get sticky. It’s all about choices and being able to have the freedom to make them without pressure, judgment, or fear.

 

When the #MeToo movement gained popularity, the education it provided made me realize certain experiences that happened to me in the past were not okay.
I’ve been in situations where I was made to feel “less than” and my consent was not given. I spent years trivializing those experiences because of a lack of resources and my own understanding.

 

 

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But the movement isn’t just for me, and I’m not the only one that needs a voice. I am married to a trans woman, which has opened my eyes to even more. Though the world seems to be becoming more accepting of the LGBTQ community, there is still a lot of shame, bullying, and stigma placed on those who feel different in their skin. There is so much ugliness in this world, near and far, that it’s heartbreaking. I try to concern myself more with the fact that EVERYONE, regardless of gender, identity, race, religion, income level, who you love, etc. are valuable and deserve to be treated with kindness and respect. I value unity and working together to make the world a place we all can thrive in.

 

 

I’d love to connect with you! 

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jnmeola

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blackbird_f1y

 

 

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Woman Wednesday: Ruby B. Johnson

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Ruby B. Johnson, Sierra Leone, West Africa

“Three things: take care of your mental health, control your narrative, and work smart and do your research.” 

 

Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I am a mining engineer and currently work at a gold mining operation. I am also the founder and editorial director of STEMher by Ruby B. Johnson Magazine. Premiered in September 2018 with its autumn issue, STEMher Magazine is a print magazine showcasing the education and experiences of girls and women in science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM) academia, careers, and programs. STEMher celebrates women thriving in their careers and inspires others to fuel their curiosity and interests in STEM; the status of individuals featured range from middle school through retirement. In one year, STEMher has featured more than 50 STEM girls and women worldwide from countries like the United States of America, Australia, Ghana, Canada, South Africa, India, France, Nigeria, Channel Islands, The Bahamas, Sierra Leone, and England. All magazine issues are available for purchase on stemher.com and Amazon Marketplace.

 

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Summer 2019 Cover

 

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I was born in Freetown, Sierra Leone [in West Africa]. I moved to the United States when I was 12 years old, which meant growing up and completing my middle school and high school education in Maryland. I graduated from Virginia Tech with a BSc in mining engineering and a minor in women’s studies leadership. While in college, I founded When You Believe Foundation, a program that empowers women and girls through social media engagement, workshops, and donations. In 2012, I competed in my first pageant, Miss Sierra Leone USA, with the platform of advocating for the recruitment and retention of girls and women in STEM fields, since I was a STEM college student at the time and women’s empowerment was something I was passionate about. I won the pageant and with that title, I was able to travel across the country as well as in Sierra Leone, encouraging girls and young women to pursue STEM. After the crowns and titles, STEM advocacy and women’s empowerment continues to be my lifelong platform. I wanted to take this platform to another level to be able to reach women and girls I may never cross paths with, so I created STEMher by Ruby B. Johnson Magazine last year. 

 

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Q: What is something valuable you’ve learned that you’d like others to know? 

A: Three things: take care of your mental health, control your narrative, and work smart and do your research. (1) From Monday through Thursdays, I work ten-hour days and a two-hour commute to and from work. Additionally, I am an entrepreneur who runs her own business creating content and putting together each issue for STEMher by Ruby B. Johnson Magazine. I also serve in a couple of ministries at my church. Life gets busy. In the last year, I’m being intentional to prioritize my mental health. Making time to rest and slow down when necessary. In order to be productive with work, I have to take care of myself by sleeping, eating healthy, exercising, spending time with God through prayer, and meditation as well as reading my Bible. I have to be intentional about making time for myself, family and friends, as well as work. It’s okay to say “no” or “not yet” sometimes. I cannot fill the cups of others when my cup is empty. It’s also okay to ask for help—whether it’s in prayer, family and friends, community, or therapy.

 

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(2) As I navigate through the professional world and life in general, I’m realizing how important it is for one to control their narrative. Of course we cannot fully control what people say about us or how they feel about us; however, I believe we can play a role in those things. The way we carry ourselves is very important. We have to learn wisdom on when to speak up or be silent. We must be our biggest defenders and tell people how we want them to treat or address us. (3) Running a business is no easy feat and it’s time-consuming. In college, I learned to not study hard but study smart. I believe that’s important to do when you are a business owner. Being that I don’t have a business or journalism background, I spend a lot of time learning—asking questions, reading articles, listening to podcasts, and everything else in between. I want this magazine to go beyond, so that means I have to put in the work. I may not see harvest immediately, but sowing seeds each day counts. All in all, I believe it’s important to know who you are, stand firm on your values, always remember your why, and never lose your humanity no matter what environment you are in. 

 

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Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: To me, feminism means being my authentic self, living out my God-given purpose, and being intentional about making a difference in the community. While working on my women’s studies leadership minor in college, I learned about intersectionality. I am a Christian woman, born and raised in Sierra Leone, a naturalized American citizen, a woman in STEM, usually one of few or only black people in some professional settings, and a family-oriented individual. I thrive because of these lived experiences but also have a heart and a curious mind to learn about those who are different from me. Feminism to me is never compromising my faith and also being compassionate to others. To me, feminism means to reach for excellence and nothing less.

 

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Woman Wednesday: Moesha

*Note: Woman Wednesday is a part of our blog. Each Woman Wednesday post will feature a woman who would like to share information in the hopes of inspiring and motivating other women. Comments are welcome below.         


Q and A with Moesha, West Memphis, Arkansas 

“The goal is to keep pushing and pushing until I get the results I want.” 

 

Q: Tell us about you. What are you passionate about?

A: I am a 21-year-old full-time entrepreneur. I was born in West Memphis, Arkansas. I didn’t know what was God’s calling for me. After high school, I went to college for 3 full years and then, I dropped out. I’ve had many people say “Why did she do that,” “I don’t think that was the right decision to make,” “You had only one year left, just stick it out.” I thought at first, well maybe they are right. Maybe I should have just finished. At that moment, I realized that all my life, I had been letting others make decisions for me, even if it cost me my own happiness. I knew that the reason I was leaving college was that I wasn’t truly happy there. I wasn’t passionate about what I was in college for. I wanted to start my own journey. I wanted to create another route. Ever since I left college, I haven’t looked back once.

 

After leaving college, I founded my skincare brand, Moe Soft Skin, which I am very passionate about. Moe Soft Skin offers handmade body scrubs, facial scrubs, lip scrubs, lip balms, body butters, and more products to come! These products are all handmade by me [using all-natural and organic ingredients, such as olive oil, almond oil, sugar, and essential oils]. I figured that if I could create something that could help my skin, maybe I could help others too. I have a skin condition called psoriasis, which is basically a severe dry skin condition that cannot be cured but can be managed. This brand is something that allows me to help others in a way that I never thought I could. It allows me to express to the world that there is something out there that can help your skin feel great without using ingredients that are so rough and hard on your skin. It’s something that helps me convey a message to other women that they are beautiful in every way and to be their best selves. It is something that is truly apart of my happiness. 

 

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As I continue to build my brand, I am constantly thinking of new ways to deliver better to my customers. I am always working up new ideas to incorporate into my business. I am just working on expanding my business and one day, I know my business will be one of the best skincare brands out in this world. With all the hard work I put in, I know that it will pay off in the end. The goal is to keep pushing and pushing until I get the results I want.

 

 

 

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I would say that I had a pretty nice childhood. I had the most fun times with family and childhood friends! My mom was big on education. I had always been an honor roll student from kindergarten all the way up to my senior year of high school. I was pretty active as a child. I started cheerleading when I was in 2nd grade until 9th grade. I started dancing when I was in 6th grade and I didn’t stop until 12th grade. These activities have taught me to be the best that I can be in life and to keep pushing, no matter how hard life gets. They also taught me to be a leader and not a follower. To simply just be me!

 

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Q: What is something valuable you’ve learned that you’d like others to know? 

A: The advice I would give to other women is “You have the power to be anything you want to be in life, so just be you.” Nothing and no one is stopping you from reaching your full potential but yourself. Go for it; it is never too late! I have sacrificed so much throughout my journey and honestly, I still am. Never let anyone influence your decisions for your life. Do what you love to do instead of what you see others doing. What works for them may not work for you. Your happiness comes before anything. When you have a happy life, great things fall into place for you. Train your mind to think positive thoughts. Turn every situation you go through into a learning experience.  Do your best. Trust the process. Enjoy the journey. 

 

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Q: What does feminism mean to you?

A: Feminism is something that pushes social change in today’s society. Women are often underestimated, and many women suffer from that. You only get to live life once, make the best of it. Feminism to me is pushing yourself as a woman to do all the things that you think you cannot do. Uplift and inspire other women around you. Live life without regrets. As women, we should all stick together and root for one another. Feminism is about speaking your truth and leading others in the right direction.

 

 

Be sure to connect with me! I am looking forward to hearing from you and connecting with you all! 

 

Email: moesha.sloan@gmail.com

Instagram accounts:

Personal Insta

Moe Soft Skin Insta

Inspiration Insta

YouTube channel coming soon! Stay tuned!

 

 

Moe Soft Skin

 

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