Woman Wednesday: Lynda


Q and A with Lynda, Long Island, NY

“I feel we live in a world where people have become very egocentric, not necessarily because we want to be, but because social media feeds into it and says it’s okay.”


“As a child in elementary school, my mother was told I would never go to college because I wasn’t smart enough.”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I am passionate about so many things. Besides being passionate about being a Christian woman of faith, wife for 24 years to the love of my life, and mom of three pretty great kids, I have always loved my 20+ year career as a speech language pathologist.

In my field, I feel rewarded when I can help improve the communication skills of others to help them succeed in whatever situation they find themselves. Be it interviews, customer service, presentations, conflicts, leadership skills, or personal relationships, we all need to be able to communicate our best selves in each situation and more.


Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I grew up on Long Island in a family that embodied both the Italian and Jewish cultures. Growing up was always about food and family and getting together with extended relatives whenever humanly possible. Yes, it was always loud with many people speaking at the same time! I also come from a family of 3 electricians that believe in hard work to get any job done. Heck, I could have been an electrician if I wanted. Growing up in not only a tight-knit family, but also a Christian home, is the basis of how I formed my strength in my family, faith, and wanting to help people.

As a child in elementary school, my mother was told I would never go to college because I wasn’t smart enough. I always struggled with reading, so I guess that’s how they made that determination. Something I always found joy in was singing…so much so that I took private lessons, sang in many groups and, proving the elementary schools wrong, was a vocal performance major in college. In my sophomore year of college, I was introduced to speech pathology by a professor teaching phonetics. She opened up a whole new world to me that I didn’t even know existed. While I loved singing, I disliked the competitive cutthroat nature of it all. When I realized many singers required speech pathologists to help with their vocal health, that was it, this is what I wanted to do.

While in graduate school, I worked with elementary school children as a speech therapist within the Florida school system. During that time, I found that I enjoyed helping children succeed with their speech and language skills, giving them the tools they needed to communicate with others to help them be social, interactive, and connect with their peers and adults. After receiving my master’s degree in 1998, I moved back to NY as an ASHA and NY state certified speech pathologist working with preschool/elementary level children.

Years later, I began working with teenagers and young adults who were also diagnosed as needing to improve their communication skills. I loved working with them even more. I saw how obtaining the communication skills improved every area of their lives, especially when it came to their work situations where these skills were imperative to their success outside the classroom.

Fast forward 10 years, 3 kids, and the explosion of technology and social media…I found that it wasn’t just my students who were diagnosed that required help with their communication skills; it was everyone all around me! From my children’s friends to the salesperson at the car dealership, from the cashier at the fast food restaurants to the hostess at an expensive steakhouse where you spend $500 for a dinner; they all exhibited difficulty with communicating in a way that acknowledged the people around them. I thought I was the only one who thought communication skills had become a bigger problem and that social media had desensitized people on how to understand and use interpersonal communication skills. Then, there it was on the news; something that confirmed and validated everything I was thinking and feeling, LinkedIn had completed a study identifying communication skills as the #1 skills gap in the work environment across America. It was clear that people were no longer aware of how important these skills are in order to succeed professionally and personally. It was clear I was onto something and knew, with my skills as a speech pathologist, I had to help others improve the art of great communication skills.

I decided to work on developing specific classes targeting communication skills and situations where you would need to have great communication for a specific purpose. I pitched my classes to a professional development administrator of a local college and they contracted me to instruct my classes to staff (administrators and professors) monthly for approximately a year. This propelled my husband to push me to open my own business, Antonetti Communications & Speech Consulting, PLLC. I now go to post-secondary trade schools to help them prepare for interviews, communicating with bosses, coworkers, and customers. To bring it full circle, my husband, who is in the electrical industry, had a connection with a trade school called the Electrical Training Center. They became my first trade school client and I have now been working with them for approximately 2 years. I have also worked at a few medical trade schools and have provided one-on-one coaching to help prepare for interviews. Additionally, I host a weekly podcast called “The Digital Divide,” where I record short episodes that provide communication tips. Currently, given the new world we live in, I am working on an online course to make it accessible to everyone.

While I continue to work part-time with my students who have been diagnosed with a deficit in their communication skills, I am excited about building my business. I want to build help and inspire those who want to transform their communication skills so they may be successful in all facets of life.


Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: I feel we live in a world where people have become very egocentric, not necessarily because we want to be, but because social media feeds into it and says it’s okay. I want people to have the ability to truly connect with one another by being present when with others, having the ability to relate, built trust, have empathy, have compassion, and being able to genuinely listen to one another without judgement. I could go on and on about all the things I would love to help improve, but ultimately, it’s about being able to build long lasting trusting relationships, be that professionally or personally. For me, the key to that is by embodying the understanding and use of effective communication while keeping the other person in mind.


Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: To me, it means that, as a woman, I have the opportunity to succeed professionally and personally without oppression or judgment from others based on my gender. It means that I am given the same opportunities and am respected, not because I am a woman, because I am able to the job just as well or better than the next guy.


Thank you for reading!


I’d love to connect with you! Click the links below:

My Website

My Podcast


Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Let us know! Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Boba Studios


Q and A with Boba Studios, Baltimore, Maryland

“Teamwork doesn’t mean that everyone gets a direct reflection of themselves in your work; it means your work is a reflection of the team as a whole.


Q: Who are you?

A: Boba Studios is a women-owned and -run game studio creating games to help represent underserved players, specifically women and people of color. In our four years of working together, our team of three has produced nine titles and is currently developing our first title aimed at publication. We are solely responsible for all aspects of front- and back-end development—everything from art, to music, to programming—and, through that, we have been granted not only the opportunity to share our stories, but be in control of telling them. We aspire to inspire further representation through creating space and opportunities for diverse developers to enter the industry by providing content for players who are often overlooked in the mass market; games created by a team who reflect them.

Pictured (from left to right): TJ, Ashley, and Kyrstin.


Our team is Ashley Guchhait as our game designer, writer, and programmer, Kyrstin Cooksey as our artist and animator, and TJ Martin as our composer and sound designer. As a small team, we fulfill many more roles than our titles let on, including providing each other feedback across our different mediums and non-art roles such as running and promoting our business. As artists, each of us have experience in many mediums, including in each other’s roles, allowing for a lot of crossover in our work. This can be in small ways from everyone sharing character dialog ideas to Ashley being Boba Studios’ graphic and UI designer, despite Kyrstin being the team’s artist. Teamwork makes the dream work!


Q: What are you currently working on?

A: Squirrely Roo Rabbit is an in-development, 2.5D, puzzle-platformer game relying on color theory to solve environmental challenges. It features a visual style reminiscent of hand-drawn and watercolor pop-up storybooks. The game’s story begins with a gang of chameleons on a coloring spree changing the colors of all the animals in their wake, causing confusion and anger. Squirrely Roo Rabbit, who is unaffected due to her being a non-traditional animal, teams up with an outcast chameleon, Cammie, to track down the Chameleon King and return the forest to normal. Powered by fruit, Squirrely Roo and Cammie explore new lands and solve their puzzles.

This is our second iteration of Squirrely Roo Rabbit, or what we call our debut title, because it’s our first game we’re intending to publish. Creative differences unfortunately led to us losing our original developer, but with that came a lot of individual growth, making us a much stronger team. Which, in turn, has enabled us to make a much stronger game.

For the past year and a half, we’ve struggled with rebuilding Squirrely Roo Rabbit from the ground up, while also improving it in all the ways needed to make it the game we always dreamed it could be. Because our ability to work together well is so vital to us—and because we were fortunate enough to have coding experience—we decided the best course of action was expanding our roles to make up for the loss of a member rather than adding someone who is not as passionate about our work to simply get the job done. It was definitely the more challenging way to do it, but it’s been beyond worth it.

The first year was the largest struggle as Ashley and Kyrstin had experience in coding games, but more on the 2D and VR side of things and on significantly smaller projects. Despite all of the challenges 2020 has brought everyone, things standing still for a bit really got our development on track. We went from having thrown out a handful of versions for not measuring up to the original, to almost having rebuilt the original in its entirety since this past March. We’re still tying things together, but we’re very excited to launch the new Squirrely Roo Rabbit this fall.



Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: Play and games, while obvious passions, are incredibly important places to start because of what they bring to the table. These forms of self-expression and exploration allows people to learn, discover, and experience in a safe space. They also serve as vehicles of empathy as you take on the persona of others, so while their premises are not always possible in our world, the feelings of empathy and understanding that players take away are certainly real.

Creating video games is the culmination of all of our passions: play, thought-provoking games, art, music, story, friendship, animals, and food. Being built on the foundation of art, music, puzzles, and storytelling, Squirrely Roo Rabbit is a great example of this. More specifically, while the story addresses serious topics, its cute and comedic nature makes the topics easily approachable. The importance of friendship is also a pillar of this story, just as it is with our team.

In more subtle ways, Squirrely Roo Rabbit also expresses our love of animals as well as food, though these interests are more apparent outside of the game. We both grew up around a lot of animals, which, for Ashley, were bunnies and puppies, and, for Kyrstin, were kittens and puppies. While some of our other games revolve around human characters, the theme of cute animals can surely be expected. Unfortunately, cooking and baking are passions which have yet to work their way into our video game practice, but, as with our games, we remain as dedicated to someone’s experience with our food as we are to a player’s experience; caring in equal parts about the taste and presentation.

Our love of art stems beyond creating things to also the enjoyment of working with our hands. We love gardening and the leafy green friends we grow just as much as we love our fuzzy animal friends!


Q: What were your younger years like?

A: To no one’s surprise, we grew up as gamers. Not just video games, either. We grew up playing all sorts of games from tabletop to live-action role playing whether it was singleplayer or multiplayer. Though, our approach to games were quite different: Kyrstin used to rack up hundreds of hours on games, replaying them over and over. Ashley, on the other hand, racked up the same amount of time on games, but over many unfinished files, all of which were used to explore the games in different ways. Despite these differing playstyles, we were both led to the conclusion that the quality of a game’s experience matters more than the act of simply beating it. We both want to find a world to not only immerse ourselves in, but a world where we want to stay. 

Ashley spent a lot of time creating games with her brother and friends. This eventually led to  her dream of creating a game studio. Kyrstin realized she wanted to become an animator for either an animation studio or a game studio when she was in college. Before settling on a career in art, however, she played around with the idea of becoming an engineer. Despite this, we both applied to the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) with traditional art portfolios including drawings, paintings, and photography. Neither of us began learning digital art tools until our classes at MICA.

Though we were both very shy kids, we learned a lot about communication from our contrasting experiences. Kyrstin spent much of her younger years moving and has lived in seven different places. So, while the people around her changed, she met many people from varying backgrounds. Ashley, on the other hand, grew up in one house where, in spite of her shyness, she had a lot of tight-knit and long-lasting friends. We’ve used these experiences to communicate our stories more effectively with others.


Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: For anyone working with others: teamwork is everything. When you’re working as a team, you’re working as one. Think of it like you’re one large person who uses different parts of themself to complete different tasks. After all, it’s not like your arms and legs serve the same function—that’s why we have teams, to fill in areas and allow everyone to become their best, most well-rounded selves. Teamwork doesn’t mean that everyone gets a direct reflection of themselves in your work; it means your work is a reflection of the team as a whole.

Communicate with each other. The only way to know if you are all on the same page is by asking. Find out what each other are thinking and what each of your goals are. It’s impossible to align yourselves together through assumptions. Without those conversations, you won’t truly know what everybody else wants, and because of that, you will all draw different conclusions because everyone thinks differently. If you can’t communicate or aren’t on the same page, that will come through in your work.


Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: Feminism is about respect. It’s about taking each other seriously and offering the same regard to everyone at the table, despite their backgrounds. It’s about lifting each other up so everyone has the opportunity to take a seat at the table in the first place. Sex does not define your abilities, qualities, or achievements. And feminism is providing everyone the opportunity to define those attributes on their own.


Q: This one is for TJ, the composer and sound designer: What do you enjoy about the work you do?

Because of my background, gaming is already a safe place for me, both on the production and consumer sides. Gaming was hugely important to me growing up, and I wish for everyone to be able to have those experiences. I’m really glad to have the opportunity to work on and promote stories written by and for women. Through that work, I hope games become a much more inclusive place for everybody.

Thank you for reading!


We’d love to connect with you! Click the links below:

Play: https://gamejolt.com/games/squirrelyroorabbit/219867

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr8Nymfkw3A

Newsletter: https://squirrelyroo.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=161fcbf120349c4f4df744a09&id=de352d822f#_=_

Website: www.bobastudios.net

Etsy Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BobaStudios

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bobastudios/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/bobastudios

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bobastudiosplay/


Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Stacy S.


Q and A with Stacy, East Bethel, Minneapolis

“Take the first step toward your dream today!


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I am a teacher of 16 years, a self-published children’s author of 2 years, a business owner (publishing company), a mom, and a wife. I am passionate about children, teaching, reading, writing, music, and inspiring and empowering others to pursue their dreams. I’ve wanted to be a teacher, mom, and author since I was little. I attended college to be a teacher, taught for years (everything from kindergarten to middle school math), got married, had 2 kids [of my own], and then decided to publish a book. I thought it would be easy, and it wasn’t! But I am a self-starter and persistent, so I kept at it until I figured it out!

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I grew up in a suburb of Minneapolis with my parents and two sisters. As children, we played “school” a lot. I wrote stories and read tons of books. I started playing piano at age 10; music has always been a huge part of my life. My parents always pushed me to do my best, never give up, and work hard to achieve my goals.

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: I’ve learned so many valuable things in my life. Set goals, dream big, take risks, believe in yourself…they all might sound “cliche,” but they are SO true! I said these to my students over and over again during my teaching career, and now, I say them to aspiring authors and others who haven’t yet pursued their own dreams (and to myself). I was never a risk taker by nature…I like things comfortable. I’m very logical and think things through (a lot) before taking the next step. As I entered the publishing world, I realized that I would need to push myself out of my comfort zone. I would need to become a risk taker in order to see this through. And I have!

Q: What can you tell readers about self-publishing?

A: In the past 2 years, I have run 3 successful Kickstarter campaigns, raising over $20,000 to publish my 3 hardcover books. I have started my own publishing company, Hop Off the Press, LLC. I have created an online school to help other aspiring authors. Check it out by clicking here.

I have created a website, done over 100 school author visits, published 5 books, a coloring book, and created custom-made stuffed kangaroos and enamel pins to go with my series. I have learned how to market on social media, run Amazon ads, sold over 20,000 books, have books for sale in over 25 local shops, done dozens of local author events and now do consulting with other aspiring authors. When I started out in the publishing business, I knew nothing about business, marketing, publishing, websites, social media…NOTHING! I learned it all by watching other successful authors, reading articles, asking questions, joining author FB groups, taking courses, and watching videos. If I can do it, you can, too! Take the first step toward your dream today!

Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: To me, feminism means empowering women to take risks, set goals, and take steps toward achieving their dreams. It means lifting other women up, not bringing them down. It means inspiring and encouraging each other to do better, to believe in ourselves, and to make the world a better place.

Thank you for reading!

Connect with me here: https://stacycbauer.com/

I’d love to connect with you!


Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Nina C.


Q and A with Nina, New York City, New York

“Getting up and facing the challenges will sometimes seem insurmountable, and you’d rather stay in bed. Get up. Keep asking questions and pushing limits and know that even if you fall, you’re going to learn something, something really valuable, and that bit of feedback will propel you further forward.”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: What am I passionate about? I’ve given this a lot of thought, especially during this pandemic when much of my industry as a Pilates trainer and swim instructor is on hiatus. My “WHY” is to inspire everyone to push out of their comfort zone so that we can experience life with more gusto and do the things we never thought possible. Whether as a Pilates instructor or swim instructor or someone who trains the senior population, it is always inspiring and literally moves me to tears when I watch them accomplish things they never thought possible—from an eight-year-old swimmer who can swim 100 meters and never thought she could do it to a client in a Pilates studio doing a walk over to one of my wonderful seniors picking up a heavier weight because what she’s been using she has decided is too light for her.

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: I am a native New Yorker, born here in Manhattan. I grew up on Long Island, went to New York University, and got a job in Corporate America. I’m very good at moving paper from one part of my desk to another, but that was never terribly fulfilling. I started to teach group fitness part time and realized I loved it and didn’t want to work in an office anymore. That sounds really simplistic; the transition took a lot longer and, at times, was really painful. But every day, I embrace this choice and I know it was worth it. I think my dad influenced me the most in that he knew and always encouraged me to be someone who never gave up—to pick myself back up even when I felt frustrated or defeated and try things again. He fostered a resilience that I have needed more than ever, especially in the last few months.

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: Something valuable I’ve learned that is something other people might want to take away from my personal story is not to give up. Things are going to be stinking hard some days. Getting up and facing the challenges will sometimes seem insurmountable, and you’d rather stay in bed. Get up. Keep asking questions and pushing limits and know that even if you fall, you’re going to learn something, something really valuable, and that bit of feedback will propel you further forward.

Caption: The Santa suit was me teaching my senior fitness classes this December. It was so fun and special. We have to be able to laugh at ourselves, right?

Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: Feminism means standing up for yourself. It’s more than equal pay for equal work, which I believe in. It’s about every little thing in the world that you encounter—as a woman—that tries to knock you down. To stand up for yourself as a woman. For so long, I brushed a lot of things off that really bothered me because I didn’t think speaking up would be meaningful. Now, I’m a little older, and hopefully, a little wiser, and I don’t have a problem when things are unfair in saying something. Feminism is about the courage to buck the system and demand to be treated equally and with dignity and respect—to be spoken to in a civil way at all times and to be able to walk away from every situation with your whole self intact.

Thank you for reading!

Connect with me here: http://www.ninacarras.com/

I’d love to connect with you!


Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂

Woman Wednesday: Louise T.


Q and A with Louise Tyrrell, Dublin, Ireland

“Life is like an ice-cream…enjoy it before it melts…”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: As I contemplate this question, my eyes glance over the photo above. It was a cold day in Dublin when the women arrived for their Winter Wellness Retreat.  Some arrived with the worries of the world on their shoulders, and you could see signs on a few faces that they really needed this well-deserved time out to let go of stress and strain so that they could relax and feel on top of the world again!

Following this fabulous day filled with gentle yoga, mindful meditations, soothing aromatherapy, and inspirational messages, everyone went home feeling refreshed, lighter, and peaceful. Even though I hosted the event, I felt totally energized and thrilled to see their transformations. That’s my passion!  Empowering women to recharge and rise and shine for midlife success by sharing what I have experienced on my personal and professional journey. 

While recovering from a car accident in the 1990’s, I discovered yoga, and it’s amazing healing powers that took me from waiting on a hospital list for spinal surgery to making a full recovery and training as a yoga teacher.  Leaving my business analyst career in corporate Dublin to set up one of the first holistic health and well-being centers in Ireland was a great decision and sparked an interest for further training in stress management, psychotherapy, meditation, mindfulness, aromatherapy, and dietetics.

I absolutely adore working, and when the coronavirus pandemic caused the cancellation of all our wellness classes and events, it was time to pivot and go online.  As anxiety levels escalated, I started sharing on social media; stress relief strategies to sprinkle through the day so that we survive and thrive through challenging times. Invitations to appear as a guest speaker on virtual events flood in and we continue to offer a Free 7 Day Beginners Yoga challenge from the comfort of home.   Having spent time training on hosting virtual events, our yoga classes and Women’s Wellness Retreats are now available online so that you can continue to stay well. I never thought I’d say it, but another passion these days is access to the internet and being able to inspire women worldwide.

Despite many set-backs, at 53, I’m delighted to have the energy for life’s ups and downs and grateful for all the life-skills I learned from my mentors, most of who I trained with in person, including Dr. Wayne Dyer, Dr Deepak Chopra, Eckhart Tolle, Tony Robbins, Robert Holden, John Assaraf, Bob Proctor, T Harv Eker, and Susan Jeffers. 

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: Growing up in Dublin during the 60’s, 70’s, and beyond was wonderful.  While we didn’t have a lot of the luxuries we have today, we had a great sense of family, friendship, and community.  I’m the eldest of 5, and my sisters and brother sometimes remind me that I was very serious growing up.  Thankfully, I lost that seriousness somewhere along the way, and nowadays, my focus is on fun and laughter.  Looking back, I recall the excitement we felt when we got our first television with 6 channels! Apart from a few years being bullied at school, my childhood was happy. I loved singing, dancing, and acting, and one of my highlights was playing the part of the wicked step-mother in Cinderella in a big theater in Dublin. 

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: After my dad passed away, I struggled with stress, sleepless nights, and time off work as my health started to slide down a slippery slope.  Like a lot of women in midlife, I was also going through the menopause.  My weight increased and my body ached a lot.  One night, I lay awake tossing and turning, thinking about the possibility of a miracle to turn it all around.  While I do believe in miracles, I also believe that the power to change how we feel is in our own hands, and it was time for me to take control and change the course of my health.  So, I set about practicing what I teach, and in time, turned it around. Health is your greatest asset, a wonderful gift to be treasured!

Q: What does feminism mean to you? 

A: During my lifetime and without going too deep into the matter, I observed that in the 60’s and 70’s when a woman got married, she was expected to stop working so that she could stay at home to look after the children, clean the house, and cook her husband’s dinner. When I was working in the 1980’s, most managers in the company were men.  Thankfully today, things are continuing to change and it is more widely acknowledged that women and men should have equal rights and equal opportunities, but we still have a long way to go.

Thank you for reading!

To conclude, I would like to thank you.  I hope you found value in this feature, and I look forward to keeping in contact with you.  You will find lots of fabulous free resources and my social media links when you VISIT: https://louisetyrrell.com.

I’d love to connect with you!


Thoughts, questions, or comments?

Comment below! 🙂